Welcome to the New Zealand Police Dog Charitable Trust.

The trust supports the work of the New Zealand Police dog section by funding activities such as acquiring breeding dogs from overseas to improve NZ Police Dog bloodlines, acquiring working dogs to add value to the NZ Police Dog section, training dogs and handlers and promoting study, research and educational programmes to support these activities. This website contains sections on the establishment of the trust and on the history of the NZ Police Dog section. You’ll also find a live feed to our Facebook page with the latest photos and dog stories. To support the work of the trust, click on the Donate tab, or take a look at our Online Shop. To find out how your contributions will be used, see the section on Funds Distribution.

POLICE DOG HISTORY

The New Zealand Police Dog Section was established in 1956, prompted by a visit by the New Zealand Prime Minister Sir Sidney Holland to the Surrey Constabulary Police School during a state visit to England.
Today the dog section is an integral part of NZ Police but this was not always the case and was almost disestablished at one point.

POLICE DOG TRAINING CENTRE

The New Zealand Police Dog Training Centre is where all handlers and police dogs undergo their training. Also located on site  is the Breeding Centre. Core trust goals include the improvement of bloodlines & acquisition of dogs and the purchase of breeding bitches is one of the ways the Trust supports the police dog section.

DONATIONS

The New Zealand Police Dog Training Centre is where all handlers and police dogs undergo their training. Also located on site  is the Breeding Centre. Core trust goals include the improvement of bloodlines & acquisition of dogs and the purchase of breeding bitches is one of the ways the Trust supports the police dog section.

About The Trust

The NZ Police Dog Charitable Trust was established in 2005 with funds from the estate the late Shirley Ellwood. Shirley was born in Temuka, New Zealand and died in Brisbane, Australia aged 68 years.  She was respected for her honesty, integrity, forthrightness, determination, compassion and strength.  She is remembered by police staff in NZ and Australia for her volunteer work and her love and respect of dogs. It is this, and the work of the NZ Police Dog Section that inspired her to put this trust in place.  In establishing the trust police worked closely with Christine Oliver, Shirley’s niece who is a trustee.  It was in consultation with Christine that the decision to name the Trust ‘’New Zealand Police Dog Charitable Trust’ was made.  This was to ensure its longevity and to provide an effective means of enabling people to donate and make bequeaths to the trust.  The trust was formally signed off by the Commissioner of Police and the Trustees on December 6, 2005.

Shirley’s intention for the trust was that funds from the trust should be used for:

– Acquisition of dogs
– Training of dogs and handlers
– The improvement of bloodlines in Police Dogs
– To promote any forms of study, research and educational programmes relevant to the above purposes and objects.

Her wishes formed the foundation of the trust’s objectives. To date, handlers from the NZ Police Dog section have undertaken courses of study in many parts of the world.  This has served to better place the NZ Police Dog Section as a world leader in the training of Police Dogs; including Patrol, Narcotic Detector and Explosive Search Dogs.  Through this exposure NZ Police Dog Training Centre now delivers training to handlers from NZ Aviation Security Services, NZ Corrections, the Pacific, Australia, Hong Kong and Singapore.

Police Dog History

The New Zealand Police Dog Section was established in 1956, prompted by a visit by the New Zealand Prime Minister Sir Sidney Holland to the Surrey Constabulary Police School during a state visit to England.
The first police dogs were brought over from England by PC Frank Riley, who arrived with his trained dog Miska as well as puppy Dante and bitches Karen and Silva. He also brought 12 puppies born during the voyage. Frank Riley soon recruited Alan Symes and Colin Guppy. This group became New Zealand’s first police dog handlers and were widely known as “The Three Musketeers”. Handlers were appointed for the puppies born on the voyage and the newly established dog teams were trained at the Police Dog Training Centre at Trentham, Upper Hutt. The Police Dog Training Centre is still based at this site and is now well known in New Zealand and overseas for its training expertise.

Today the dog section is an integral part of New Zealand Police, but this was not always the case. At one point, Constable Guppy and his dog Dante were told to carry out a tracking exercise in the hills behind the Dog Training Centre. He was told where the decoy “offender” was last seen and Dante picked up the scent. They tracked the “offender” for two hours and found him at 10:58am. Later Constable Guppy found out that if he had not found the “offender” by 11:00am, the dog section would have been disestablished.

Beyond the Call of Duty

Police Dog GAZZA

22/04/2016

Great partner to:
Const J Robertson

Police Dog GAGE

13/07/2010

Great partner to:
Snr Const B Lamb

Police Dog ENZO

9/8/2007

Great partner to:
Const K Cording

Police Dog DUKE

18/2/2003

Great partner to:
Snr Const W Phiskie

Police Dog VALOUR

8/2/1998

Great partner to:
Const B.A McLeod

Police Dog MAL

3/10/1996

Great partner to:
Const S Salmond

Police Dog JOCK

17/7/1994

Great partner to:
Const A.J Staples

Police Dog KONE

18/5/1994

Great partner to:
Const A Phillips

Police Dog SPIKE

15/5/1994

Great partner to:
Const J Roff

Police Dog REX

20/10/1992

Great partner to:
Const G Gywn

Police Dog RYKA

15/5/1992

Great partner to:
Const S Shadbolt

Police Dog LANCE

18/10/1991

Great partner to:
Const C Edge

Police Dog JOSH

25/3/1989

Great partner to:
Const C Howard

Police Dog SPRING

15/04/1989

Great partner to:
Sgt B Farquhar

Police Dog RADA

18/12/1989

Great partner to:
Const G Diver

Police Dog OZI

27/10/1988

Great partner to:
Const E Gorrie

Police Dog SARGE

12/10/1984

Great partner to:
Const E Gorrie

Police Dog LUKE

28/10/1983

Great partner to:
Const J Donald

Police Dog PANZER

11/7/1983

Great partner to:
Const G Bradford

Police Dog EBBA

21/3/1983

Great partner to:
Const E Gorrie

Police Dog JON

03/11/1982

Great partner to:
Const G Stock

Police Dog BARLOW

21/11/1979

Great partner to:
Const A Rowlands

Police Dog THOR

28/7/1977

Great partner to:
Const D McKibbin

Police Dog NICK

412/1975

Great partner to:
Const M Cameron

Police Dog NERO

24/11/1972

Great partner to:
Const DB Painter Bem

The Wall of Remembrance

The Wall of Remembrance at the New Zealand Police Dog Training Centre was unveiled in March 2017, recognising the 24 dogs killed on duty.

Live Facebook Feed

Online Shop

POLICE DOG TRUST CALENDAR

Another knockout calendar for 2022, featuring dogs and puppies from the New Zealand Police Dog Section. 

NZ POLICE DOG MAKO SOFT TOY

Soft and cuddly German Shepherd Police Dog soft toy wearing the New Zealand Police Dog Mako Harness

THE ADVENTURES OF POLICE DOG ACE

After ‘The Adventures of Police Dog Zeus’ New Zealand Police Dog Handler Sue Burridge, has written another exciting children’s book.

WHERE THE FUNDS GO

Funds Distribution

BREEDING STOCK

The New Zealand Police Dog Section has a requirement to breed 80-120 pups per year.  This includes German Shepherds for Patrol Dog work and Labrador Retrievers for Detection work.   In order to maintain an effective breeding programme, new stock must be introduced periodically to strengthen our own breeding lines and to make improvements in certain dog attributes.  The NZ Police Dog Trust has assisted in the procurement of frozen semen from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.  We have recently imported frozen semen from 3 German Shepherd Dogs, all of which come from proven European working dog lines.  We have also imported frozen semen from 4 Labrador Retrievers from well proven Labrador Retriever working dog lines.  In addition we have recently imported an adult female German Shepherd from Wales named Ava (UK).  She was mated in the UK and has now travelled to New Zealand and given birth to 10 pups.  The goal is to raise these pups to become operational working or breeding dogs for the NZ Police Dog Section.  We have also purchased a number of pups which will travel to New Zealand at around 9 months of age to be raised as potential breeding dogs.  Plans are in place to import additional dogs and frozen semen as suitable options are identified and approved.

NEW TRAILER

The Police Dog Trust recently funded a new trailer for the NZ Police Dog Section. The trailer can transport up to 6 police dogs undertaking training at the NZ Police Dog Training Centre. This new trailer has replaced an old trailer that was over 20 years old.
The trailer offers more room and better all-round comfort for police dogs.

HITS – SAN FRANCISCO

In Sept 2017, two members from the NZ Police Dog Section attended the International Handler Instruction & Training Seminar (HITS), in San Francisco.
HITS is America’s premier Police Dog training conference held annually. It is America’s largest police dog event both in terms of numbers attending with 1000 plus handlers and trainers but also equipment supply with over 100 vendors.

Our dog section members attended 12 seminars covering a range of topics. The main focus from the NZ perspective was use of muzzles in police dog training. Tuition from instructors from American and Israeli backgrounds gave a new and unique perspective on muzzle training. Classes covering police dog tactics in dealing with America’s environment of serious crime provided some eye opening moments including a heartfelt incident debrief from a South Carolina handler who lost a leg and K9 partner during an incident.

The trip opened up networks with police personal across America and also provided a very valuable insight into training of police dogs and handlers from an international perspective. It allowed the NZ Police Dog Section to see how it sits with what’s happening in other parts of the world.

This valuable trip was possible due to funding from the NZ Police Dog Charitable Trust.

AUSTRALASIAN DOG TRIALS

Trials are about competing against the Australians states but also bench marking our standards with Australia. It was pleasing to see NZ doing very well in both Patrol and Detector dog training taking out 1st and 2nd place and team trophy for Patrol Dog. Detector dogs was very close with final result coming down to the last search and NZ placing 3rd.
This important event would not have been possible without the support and funding from PDT.

DOG ENRICHMENT STRUCTURE

Trust funds have been used for this great addition to the Dog Training Centre.
This structure has allowed for a much more enriching environment for our dogs to be in and is already being well utilised by the dogs who have been having great fun using it. As well as a superb playground for the dogs it also serves as a shelter during winter and summer.

Staff at the DTC are delighted with the new structure and extremely grateful to the Police Dog trust for funding this worthwhile project.

CASHA & DJUNA

The NZ Police Dog Trust provides funding support to the Police Dog Programme for the acquisition of dogs and the improvement of genetic bloodlines.  It is essential to maintain diversity in any large working dog population and the right type of dog is needed for the specific job role of a Police Dog.  This means accessing quality stock from proven Police, Military and Working Dog breeders internationally. Casha and Dunja were purchased from the Tiekerhook kennels in the Netherlands to improve NZ police dog bloodlines. Casha and Dunja were both pregnant when they arrived in New Zealand in February 2015 and have since produced further litters of puppies

Casha – Casha V. Tiekerhook
Dam: Tess V. Tiekerhook and Sire: Black Jack Von Der Teufelskehle

Casha was pregnant to Brisco Vom Patriot and gave birth to seven puppies on 10.04.2015 (four males and three females). All were sables except for one jet black male puppy. In New Zealand she was mated to Trentham Gus and gave birth to three puppies on 07.10.2015 (two males and one female). All were sables except for one jet black female. As at March 2016, Casha has contributed 10 puppies to be trained as police dogs. Casha enjoys water and the company of people and other dogs.

DUNJA – Dunja V. Tiekerhook
Dam: Tess V. Tiekerhook and Sire: Pike Del Lupo

Dunja was pregnant to Brisco Vom Patriot when she arrived in NZ and gave birth early to six puppies on 24.03.14 (three males and three females). All were sable coated except for one jet black female. She was mated to Trentham Isaac and had 6 Puppies on 24.10.14 – exactly 7 months after her first litter. This litter was also made up of three males and three females. All were sable except for one jet black male. As at March 2016 Dunja has contributed 12 puppies to be trained. Dunja spent some time as a pup in Czech Republic where she lost a toe in a kennel accident.  This has not slowed her down and she still enjoys doing everything at full speed.  She enjoys the water and on one occasion got into a pond and refused to come out until DTC staff went in and got her out.

IWDBA CONFERENCE

Attendance at the IWDBA Conference has provided the following benefits:

  1. The conference focuses genetic improvement, artificial insemination and techniques for maximising mating success and litter size, general canine reproduction and health care.  Other topics include working dog health: ways to measure and improve dog health, along with prevention strategies and optimum treatment options.  The importance of nutrition and fitness is highlighted with a number of studies and presentations provided on these topics.  The development of an International working dog database has also been discussed. This is critical for sharing genetic knowledge worldwide.
  1. The conference provides an ideal opportunity to network and to develop professional relationships with international working dog organisations.  Cooperation has been established with a number of Police organisations in Europe, North America and Australia, enabling opportunities to import breeding stock and frozen semen to NZ.  This has provided diversity and dog quality improvements for our own genetic pool, essential to the long term viability of any working dog breeding programme.
  1. As a result of connections made during the last conference, NZ Police were able to host a Working Dog Behaviour and Development Seminar, run by Dr Esther Schalke and Mr Hans Ebbers – both internationally recognised professionals in the areas of dog behaviour and operational Police Dog work.  The seminar highlighted important advancements in the development and training of working dogs and has resulted in the evaluation of current practice to reflect those advancements and knowledge.
POLICE DOG SECTION SUPPORT

The Trust furthers the training of handlers and dogs but also looks for opportunities to support the police dog section where appropriate. To this end a grant was approved to purchase and distribute copies of the book “Emotional Survival for Law Enforcement” to all dog sections as an additional resource for handlers.

EARLIER PROJECT GRANTS

From 2006-2010 the trust funded a number of police dog handlers to visit police dog sections in Canada, USA and Australia to benchmark their own practice and look at development opportunities. This ensures we maintain our high standards of training and dog management. Developing cooperative international relationships enables NZ Police share breeding stock with other international groups and to keep up to date with best practice in breeding, pup development and health care. The trust supports the development of these relationships by funding overseas travel.

2006
Constable J Owen (Rotorua) – Canada: Tracking
Sgt B Marley (Wellington) – New South Wales: Handler Selection

2008
Constable M Robinson (Rotorua) – Queensland: Dog Operations
S/C A Campbell (Wellington) – USA: Detector Dog Training

2010
S/C G Knight (Hawkes Bay) – The Netherlands: Human Scent Identification